Modern Times

Mathew Baker: The First Naval Architect.

Modern Times, As Seen Through Ship Design, Part 2.

Drawing ships on paper was something new, usually someone wanted a ship and it was built.
Mathew Baker’s drawing of a race-built galleon.

The changes that appeared with the dawn of the Fifth Epoch at the beginning of
the fifteenth century were clearly apparent around 150 years later. Because this isn’t to look at the life of Mathew Baker, but to look at the times he lived in that led him to deal with the world around him in an entirely new way. Baker was a master shipwright, a skill so profound that it requires a man to all but smell the shape of the piece of wood they’re forming. In this respect, Baker was the equal
of the men who created the Mary Rose, but living just a few decades later made an enormous difference to his abilities to reflect on the things he did.

Mathew Baker was truly a man of his time, yet he respected those who went before
him. Baker could not have been the shipwright he was without that feeling of reverence to his elders – and this has a very real difference in quality to the intellectual who is humiliated by those who are superior to him. Baker was a superb craftsman, and as such, could stand proudly before his monarch in the way that might
intimidate an archbishop. Put another way, Baker could look at the creations of his forefathers and think “they were working with what they had, and still they were able to build such excellent vessels”.

Continue reading “Mathew Baker: The First Naval Architect.”

Economics

How To Work With American Businessmen.

88695-p507i2b-2bchinaman2bbusinessman2bshaking2bhands2bwith2ban2bamerican2bbusinessmanIn One Easy Lesson

Technology is one of those areas where price competition is at its toughest, and companies across the planet are producing equipment that is effectively the same – from diggers to supertankers. Oh, and computers of course. The result of producing all but identical equipment means there’s little choice you can make between them all, except of course, if you’re an expert. Which means most people buy either out of habit – or failing this, on price.

It was with price in their minds that an American computer company – its name is irrelevant as it could be any one of them – outsourced the production of small circuit boards to a company in Taiwan. Continue reading “How To Work With American Businessmen.”