Art · Creativity

Sitting To Table.

Robert Therrien “No Title,” 2003; A Table And Four Chairs.

It is a monumental piece of work that is as sombre as it is large
Robert Therrien’s ‘Table And Four Chairs’ is huge. It doesn’t really make you think of anything save that it is, well, big.
Courtesy of ARTIST ROOMS: Tate and National Gallery Of Scotland.

I was back at the Pont gallery last week, and as before, had a ball with its 25 year retrospective. It wasn’t a ball because of the installations or the artwork, but because of the company I found there.

Continue reading “Sitting To Table.”

Advertisements
Art · Mind The Gap!

The Five Legged Beasts Of Nineveh.

and as guardians were shown as godlike figures having human heads with bull’s bodies or that of a lion – and the wings of an eagle.
The Limassu stands well over six metres high, and must weigh several tons. They also have five legs… which is what this post is all about. Why the Assyrians depicted them with five legs.

A very long time ago, I visited the British Museum in London. In their great hall where they display their collection of monumental sculptures there stood two enormous creatures. They stand well over six metres high, that is nearly twenty feet and must weigh several tons. I knew they stood as guardians to the entrances to palaces in ancient Assyria, and as guardians were shown as godlike figures having human heads with bull’s bodies or that of a lion – and the wings of an eagle. Continue reading “The Five Legged Beasts Of Nineveh.”

Art · Our Subconscious

What Do I Look For In Art?

De Pont in Tilburg, Review: 25th Anniversary.

a view of de ponts interior showing some of their artworks from the last 25 years
De Pont in Tilburg is an old factory. It’s huge, but for all that, welcoming. Mainly because it was so busy!

I din’t know it when I trotted off to Tilburg today, it was on a whim and mainly because they’d pulled up the tracks to Rotterdam which was my intended destination today. I rarely do any fact checking before leaving, but that’s part of the fun of having so many galleries to visit in the Netherlands. It was a small and little known painting by Hieronymous Bosch that I wanted to see in Rotterdam, or at least photograph. I saw it last weekend, but what with my capacity for forethought, I’d left my camera at home. Its only importance – the Bosch, that is – is that it contradicts something Rudolf Steiner said about Goethe’s Mephistopholes. Never mind that, it’s not for public consumption. My other thoughts about Bosch will be, but that’s for another of my fabled upcoming series. Anyway, I visited Tilburg, got lost, found myself again and having turned in the other direction to which I was merrily cycling, found the gallery.

Continue reading “What Do I Look For In Art?”

Art · The Comfort Zone

Piet Mondriaan: Mill In The Sunlight 1908.

Molen Bij Zonlicht, 1908.

It's as if the painter can't trust his viewer to see what has been painted. But then, with the Dutch, who are a bone headed lot at the best of times, these painters might have had a point.
Piet Mondriaan: Molen Bij Zonlicht.
Collectie Gemeentemuseum Den Haag.

I didn’t go to the Gemeentemuseum in the Hague on Saturday to see the Mondriaan exhibition; I went to see the paintings by Isaac Israel and his friend George Breitner. But to get to this exhibition I had to go through the Mondriaan exhibition and it stopped me in my tracks. The exhibition is entitled, “De Ontdekking Van Mondriaan” or ‘Discover Mondrian‘.

Continue reading “Piet Mondriaan: Mill In The Sunlight 1908.”

Art · Creativity

Auguste Rodin: A Female Centaur c1887.

It is true that one can see the beauty of the whole that lies in but a part of the sculpture – that is to employ our imagination in the way a true artist intends.
The side view of Rodin’s female centaur.
Musée Rodin, Paris.

It is true that, like Rodin, one can see the beauty of the whole that lies in but a part of the sculpture – that is to employ our imagination in the way a true artist intends. Like Tom Thomson’s paintings that on first view appear only half finished; but that is their art, they are there for you to finish in your mind. And in finishing it, you add something more than the imagery, you add the birdsong and the scent of wild flowers or the lapping of the waves on the lakeside.

Rodin took this a little further in that he would find himself inspired to sculpt an arm or a leg with a particular gesture – and whilst this is clearly the stuff of genius, it is still in the realms of being a practice piece. Art is an expression of one’s own relationship to nature – be it through colour, sound or form. We do not have relationships with arms or legs, we have relationships with the humans they are part of.

Continue reading “Auguste Rodin: A Female Centaur c1887.”

Art · Modern Times

Auguste Rodin Galatea In A Cup; Circa 1900.

Auguste Rodin, Part 3.

For beauty to be half formed was enough for Rodin.
Rodin’s ‘Galatea In A Cup’ showing human and material beauty. Note that the chalice is complete!
Musée Rodin, Paris.

The myth of Pygmalion which is spoken of in Ovid’s Metamorphosis has Pygmalion searching for beauty incarnate. This search takes the form of his making his image of beauty as a sculpture, the beauty that lies in the female form. The Greeks weren’t partial about beauty, they saw it in everything – but they did see it at its highest in mankind. So Pygmalion set about his sculpture which he found enrapturing.

Continue reading “Auguste Rodin Galatea In A Cup; Circa 1900.”

Art · Mind The Gap!

Auguste Rodin: Le Penseur; The Thinker, 1903.

Indeed, the original name for the work was 'The Poet' but was later changed to the thinker.
Le Penseur, by Auguste Rodin. This plaster cast was made in 1903.
It depicts Dante sitting on a stone and looking down on the lower levels of hell.
Musée Rodin, Paris.

This is, without question, Rodin’s best known work. Originally conceived in the early 1880s as part of his portal ‘The Gates Of Hell’ which depict the horrors that the poet Dante Alighieri described in his ‘Inferno’. Indeed, the original name for the work was ‘The Poet’ but was later changed to the thinker. This sculpture, made in 1903 is made of plaster and is around five feet high. It was an immense undertaking, a challenge that Rodin was equal to. Continue reading “Auguste Rodin: Le Penseur; The Thinker, 1903.”