Our Subconscious · Reality

Dutch Dog Walkers And Dutch Dogs.

It’s not a problem for the Dutch alone, but when it comes to walking their dogs, it’s usually a case of the dog walking the Dutch. When a dog’s pulling at the lead, the dog is telling the walker that the dog is boss. It’s not very helpful in a world where the busy road next to them has cars travelling at 60km/h (40mph). Oh, and it’s a 30km/h zone… but again, that’s not something limited to the Dutch alone. But these are problems we’ve created for ourselves.

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A Human Menagerie · The Comfort Zone

Marking Exams In Holland.

My friend Hendrik and I were chatting, and he mentioned that his university had cut the time he would have to mark his exams. He said that they were only allowing him two weeks instead of three to hand in the results.

Naturally, being me, I asked him if three years ago, they’d told him that he’d only have three weeks to mark the exams instead of four?

All Hendrik could say was “how can you know that?”

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Mind The Gap! · The Comfort Zone

Why, the phrase”I hear voices” is woefully inadequate in summing up the horrendous nature of mental illness (3)

I shared something from Alex Sarll the other day, this is part three. It is an exploration of what I came to call “The Comfort Zone”. Her problem was that she couldn’t find hers.

Well, now she can. It’s cost her a very great deal; at least she got there in the end. Actually, given that she’s in her 30s, she got there in time to begin…

A person’s challenges are equal to their ability to meet them.

(Continued from part 2..) It’s like there is a web of fears, doubts and terrors shrouding your positive mind, and once something tips your train of thought over onto the lines of that …

Source: Why, the phrase”I hear voices” is woefully inadequate in summing up the horrendous nature of mental illness (3)

Economics · Modern Times

The Proletariat And Its Woes.

In Rudolf Steiner’s lecture series ‘World Economy’ he speaks of those people who have no particular skill to offer the world. We live in a time when the manner in which humanity has evolved raises challenges to itself, and does so on account of widening perceptions. In and of itself, this brings people into situations that would never have been possible in the mediaeval cultures. This was a time when humans made everything they needed: and if you wanted a purple edging for your toga, you had to spend a substantial amount of money to obtain it. The edging might cost three to five times what the rest of the garment cost.

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Emotional Intelligence · Our Subconscious

My Most Powerful Weapon.

This trend was not a marker of intelligence: The researchers looked at each student’s ACT score (1) and found that among students with the same ACT score, the more attractive ones did significantly better in class.

They also found that male professors were more likely than female professors to give higher grades to pretty women.

Here’s the kicker: When these same students took online courses, the deviation disappeared completely.

US News

Most professors are men. If you don’t believe me, just nip over to Linkedin and do a quick search. You’ll discover that most of them are. This doesn’t mean that women aren’t intelligent, humans are human after all. What it does mean is that humans – men and women – are partial when it comes to the truth. They want their version of the truth and that’s an end of the matter.

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Economics · Modern Times

Shrink Wrapped Chicken.

The Difference Between Chicken In London And Budapest.

Commodities are sold by the kilo for a known price. Everything else has been pared away.
Shrink wrapped items on the supermarket shelf. The price is dependent on nothing more than its weight. . Everything else has been sliced off. It’s the ultimate expression of knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing.

It was a long time ago, when a friend from uni was a little boy and was sent to stay with his grandparents in Hungary. This would be in the sixties, when the eastern part of the capital, Budapest, was still semi-rural. Laszlo – Les to his friends who couldn’t pronounce his name – wondered what the brown fluffy birds were that ran about the streets. He was told that they were chickens. Baffled at this, he asked why they didn’t have plastic wrappers.

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